Twitch censors live metallica performance with dorkiest music imaginable

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BlizzCon is an annual event in which fans of Blizzard Entertainment’s games, such as Diablo, Starcraft, World of Warcraft, Hearthstone, and others, get together to celebrate the company’s games and get glimpses of all of the upcoming new content. The opening ceremonies for this year’s BlizzCon took place today. And despite the fact that the event was held entirely online this year — or “BlizzConline,” as it has been awkwardly portmanteau’d — several important disclosures were made today. One of these was the announcement that the fan favourite Diablo II will be remastered and re-released later this year. What BlizzCon 2021 did not have, however, was a humorous atmosphere — at least, not until Metallica hit “the stage.”

If it were any other year, the sight of one of the most popular dad rock bands in the world mingling with the orcs that represent the Blizzard fans would be merely another instance that would cause attendees of BlizzCon to become hyped up. This year, however, the opening ceremonies were made available to watch live via the official BlizzCon page as well as YouTube and Twitch. And all of you individuals are aware of what takes place when music that is legally permitted to be played online, aren’t you? That’s right: there are concerns with the copyright!

According to Uproxx, the audio of James, Lars, and the lads’ performance was presumably uploaded to YouTube and the BlizzCon page as per usual; however, the entirety of the performance appears to have been removed from the YouTube upload of the event. However, on Twitch… Things did not go particularly well for me on Twitch. Which is to say that, despite the fact that it was being streamed on the organization’s official Twitchgaming channel, the performance was ominously preceded by a chyron that stated, “The forthcoming musical performance is subject to copyright protection by the applicable copyright holder.” And then the following took place:

And, look here: Is it possible to provide evidence that someone at Twitch intentionally selected the cheesiest, most Zelda forest-ass music imaginable to have Metallica rock their little hearts out to, rather than broadcasting their extremely copyrighted music (and, as a result, having to deal with the possibility of issuing one of their ubiquitous DMCA takedown notices to themselves)? It goes without saying that this is not the case, just as we are unable to provide conclusive evidence that Twitch subsequently transitioned to, for example, “lo-fi rhythms to publicly thrash to” to complete the set. It is entirely conceivable that what you heard was, you know, the copyright-free audio that Twitch already possessed and that they just chose to overdub it with the music of one of the most famous rock bands in the history of the world. On the other hand, we can demonstrate that it is extremely funny to watch this happen, especially—as many people have pointed out—since Metallica is at least partially responsible for the restrictive nature of many online musical streaming laws that dominate the internet today, as a result of their high-profile campaign against Napster way back when the MP3 was first being developed.

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